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For that all that care (how wearisome soever) was no less than necessary, may appear from what I can aver with truth and soberness, That in several of these Posthumous pieces I found that (either through the hast or of the Scribe, or through his mistaking the Author's hand, or for what other reason I affect not to enquire) there were too many aberrations from the Original: Sometimes a line or more being left out; elsewhere some words omitted or mistaken, and others substituted in the room thereof, to the impairing at least of the Sense.To instance in one or two Tracts for all: In two of the former Editions of the .That (besides that some of the formerly-printed Discourses and Tracts are now published with several XXXII.Additional Pieces in this Edition, (no slight nor inconsiderable accession to the Author's Works. Who also hath made us able ministers of the New Testament, not of the Let­ter, but of the Spirit; for the Letter killeth, but the Spirit giveth life.And the like accommodation of the Rea­der is endeavour'd (not only as to the forementioned Treatises, but) as to the rest of his Works, which could not be without great inconvenience divided into as also by what is set in the top of every Page, which doth summarily import what is contain'd therein.6.And now after all this, when I could not think there was any thing un­cared-for wherein I might be farther instrumental to the Reader's accommoda­tion and the publick good, I was sollicited (and with some continued importu­nity) to another trouble. to the end of that Tract, and (to name no more) pag. Yet it was less difficult for me to deny my self some ease by undertaking this new labour, than to deny the importunity of others, their desire especially be­ing back'd with this consideration, That it would conduce more to the bene­fit of all Readers.

There is one thing more that is not impertinent to be here advertis'd, That whereas the Author did use, in several of his Chappel-exercises and other Dis­courses delivered in publick, to quote the as judging it perhaps more fit and useful to quote them in a Language which might be understood by all that heard him, even by the younger Students, than to make an astonishing clatter with many words of a strange sound and of an unknown sense to some in the Auditory: I thought it would be most for the advantage of this Edition, (now that the forementioned reason of his then quoting in Latine did cease, his Discourses being now exposed to the publick view) to set down these Authorities (all, or part of them) in their own Language, especially where it is more significant and emphatical. where he relates the several opinions of some Hebrew Doctors concerning there is set down in the margins what I thought might give far­ther light to his Observations; besides a summary account of the Author's Me­thod in those Discourses set all along in the margins.

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And for the better clearing the sense of some Authors in such places as seem'd most intricate, I neglected not to consult either Ecclesiastical Antiquaries or those that had commented upon the Fathers, such as I could meet with in private or publick Libraries; (though oftentimes my consulting such proved but a fruitless, though toilsom, labour; it being the fashion of many Commentators to write a deal of agreeably to whose judgment and the sense of the most diligent Writers, as also to the scope of the place, (not neglecting also sometimes to consult the living, and the better, Libraries) I have render'd some Passages, which haply at first sight may seem to others to import otherwise.

There is this yet farther to be advertis'd, That where the Testimonies out of and thought himself richly rewarded by his discourse for every journey he made to his Chamber.) In these Three there is an endeavour to represent the Author's Picture at large and in his full proportions.

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