Barbie dating dressup games

Rated 3.99/5 based on 988 customer reviews

Barbie was born to wear clothes, a destiny fulfilled during her heyday in the 80’s and 90’s, when Barbie’s brand exploded with playsets, plastic shoes and militant hot pink advertising. Mattel’s leading girl-oriented franchise had the undivided attention of half the toy-buying market.

Naturally, Mattel was one of the first companies to start producing what tech and culture critic Justine Cassell refers to as “Pink Software,” games designed with stereotypical girly motifs.

Flash interfaces residing on domains with names like game2girls.com, games with titles like “Pretty Princess Makeover” or “Justin Bieber Photography.” “Help this royal misfit with a makeover so she can become a very pretty princess,” reads the description for a production titled “.” I wish I made that up.

Stand alone dress-up games operate under the assumption that their audience has a one-track mind.

Ruth Handler, mother of Barbie, originally created the iconic plastic bombshell to solve the limitations of these paper dolls.

A three-dimensional doll allowed children to roleplay after dressing the figure.

blurred the lines of virtual and physical dolls by allowing players to print their clothing creations, enabled by special fabric sheets included with the game.

To dress Barbie in the printed clothes, you had to cut and tape the templates together, much like traditional paper dolls.

barbie dating dressup games-59

barbie dating dressup games-24

1: A Brief History of the Dress-Up Game The dress-up genre is characterized by unbelievable shittiness.

Mattel’s first Barbie title was a dress-up game creatively named The plot is this: Ken gives you a call and asks you out on a date; you then go shopping, picking situational garments appropriately.

This design uses clothing as puzzle pieces, where a correct combination triggers a new puzzle.

Standalone dress-up games have a long, mediocre lineage.

In the early 90s, the ) gained popularity thanks to early internet communities of Japanese computer hobbyists and manga enthusiasts.

Leave a Reply